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Woman scammed out of $10,000 after playing card game at Georgia mall, cops say

The woman was approached by a stranger who asked her to watch a game, officials said. Jarosław Kwoczała via Unsplash

A woman was scammed out of $10,000 after she agreed to play a card game in a mall, police in Georgia said.

The Dunwoody Police Department received a report that a woman, who was not identified, had recently been reeled into the scam at Perimeter Mall after she was approached by a stranger.

A stranger asked the victim if she would keep an eye on their game so the stranger “would not be taken advantage of,” according to the news release from police.

The victim agreed and was led to a space in the mall where the stranger played a three-card game against a dealer. The bets in the game began to climb higher, nearly reaching $30,000, police said.

As the victim watched, she realized that she had been identifying the right cards to win the game. When the dealer asked the victim if she wanted to play, the victim agreed, police said. The only catch was that she had to bet at least $10,000.

The victim drove to the bank and withdrew $10,000, then drove back to the mall and met with the dealer, according to the release.

“When the victim chose the wrong card, the dealer grabbed the envelope with the $10,000 and walked away,” police said in the release.

The scam is under investigation and police are warning the public to avoid any similar situations where strangers offer money-making opportunities.

“This is not the first time someone has been scammed out of a large sum of money from a “game” particularly at the mall. If you are ever approached by a random person asking if you would like to make some money, simply say ‘No, thank you’ and walk away.”

Dunwoody is about 15 miles north of Atlanta.

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